From the tiles that will go on the walls to the appliances that will be installed, anyone who has completed a home renovation before knows that it is better to have just about everything picked out before you begin the work. This is because you will need to make numerous decisions once the renovation starts, and the more you’ve made beforehand, the better off—and better educated—you will be. Online tools like Pinterest, showroom visits, and/or material samples can help, and don’t be afraid to start purchasing items to get the ball rolling. 
If you jump into a remodeling project with an ambiguous contract or no contract at all, you may as well hire an attorney and set a court date right away. "The contract needs the right address, a start date, a completion date, and a detail of what is and is not going to be done," says Rosie Romero, founder of Legacy Custom Builders in Scottsdale, Arizona.

There has yet to be a home renovation that has been silky smooth, without a single snag or snafu, so be prepared for days when things just aren't going right. It’s natural to want everything to go perfectly according to plan, but with so many products and people involved, it’s unlikely that everything will turn out exactly how you imagined, which can be frustrating and sometimes even costly. 
The mobile home we purchased for remodel as a cabin that came with the property has no insulation we are going to take off the ugly paneling and wall boards to install new drywall. The home has good bones subfloor etc. electrical and plumbing we will be replacing the floors with engineered hardwood for kitchen laundry and bathrooms (we have done the research for best options). All that to ask should we lay flooring carpeting or do drywall first we will have this professional done. Love all your tips
From the tiles that will go on the walls to the appliances that will be installed, anyone who has completed a home renovation before knows that it is better to have just about everything picked out before you begin the work. This is because you will need to make numerous decisions once the renovation starts, and the more you’ve made beforehand, the better off—and better educated—you will be. Online tools like Pinterest, showroom visits, and/or material samples can help, and don’t be afraid to start purchasing items to get the ball rolling. 
First, look at BIY (Buy It Yourself and then have a professional contractor install). Mention to your contractor you’d like to buy some supplies yourself. This can reduce material cost markups. With this strategy, however, I will caution you. Most mid to large sized contractors will tell you to go ‘pound salt.’ They won’t let you BIY because they want to control the materials used and their schedule. Smaller remodeling contractors are more likely to go along with your goal to save a few bucks here.
The cost to demo a kitchen can vary depending on how much of the space you’re demolishing. A full kitchen demolition, including plumbing moving costs, can cost anywhere from $1,205 to $2,160. But if you are only demolishing part of your kitchen, or keeping your plumbing as-is, your costs may be much lower. The following table provides a breakdown of how much a partial kitchen demolition might cost:  
For something so disproportionately small in the bathroom’s grand scheme of things, fixtures and hardware are so important for providing that chic finishing touch on the entire space. And, truly, the cost is not that much for such a major impact. In fact, if you did nothing more than replace an old sink faucet, your entire bathroom would look significantly better.
Shiplap, old barn wood, ornate knobs, old-fashioned farmhouse sink, and classic furniture are just some examples of things that can be refurbished for use in your new kitchen. Picking small things like this can ease the cost of buying everything brand new, and lets you buy the important things new while adding decorative touches that are new-to-you. 
Only you know your DIY experience level. A good rule of thumb is that if you don’t completely understand, leave it to a pro. This is especially true when it comes to any electrical kitchen remodeling project or an appliance installation. Contractors will know best how to make sure a new installation is correct while keeping everyone safe. When it comes to safety, always call a pro.
“We wanted new granite (or similar) countertops, but with a new roof, a baby on the way, a home refi (and a few other larger expenses) we just couldn’t swing it. So I once again turned to Pinterest, where I stumbled upon this blog post with steps detailing how to pretty easily convert your existing countertops to polished concrete coated ones. We decided that this was the only way for us to go (at least for now until we are possibly ready to professionally update them in the future).”
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